Applies to TestComplete 14.70, last modified on October 20, 2020

About

With TestComplete, you can create functional tests for your web applications and Rich Internet Applications (RIA) that run in a web browser or outside of it to verify that they work correctly. You can record and play web page navigation, logging in and out, filling out and submitting forms, searching product catalogs, placing orders, and other operations. You can also verify the data and attributes of web page elements, link validity, and the web page structure and accessibility.

Depending on your testing goals, you can implement one of the possible approaches to web testing: default or cross-platform:

  • Default web testing is available starting from TestComplete version 14.4. It allows creating and running functional tests in any supported web browser, but only on the Windows operating system.

  • Cross-platform web testing allows recording browser- and platform-independent tests and run them in a wide range of web browsers—not only in those that TestComplete supports, but also in new ones, like Opera and Safari, run in a broad range of environments—Windows, Linux, Unix, Mac OS, and mobile Android and iOS.

Selecting approach

Regardless of the approach you choose, you create and debug your tests on your local computer by using TestComplete and one of the supported web browsers.

Each of the web testing approaches has its specifics that may or may not meet your testing needs and goals.

Default Web Testing Cross-Platform Web Testing
Pros
  • You can create web tests by recording a sequence of actions in a web browser.
  • You can create and run web tests in all major web browsers.
  • You can get detailed test results.
  • You do not need additional hardware or software to run your tests, only TestComplete/TestExecute and your web browser.
  • You can easily iterate through supported web browsers and run your web test in each of them.
  • Your test can include various verifications, including verification of tabular contents, web page accessibility, and performance.
  • You can map objects of your tested web application and store them in the Name Mapping repository.
  • You can test web applications that use third-party web controls.
  • You can test Flash, Flex, AIR, and Silverlight web applications
Pros
  • You can create web tests by recording a sequence of actions in a web browser.
  • You can map objects of your tested web application and store them in the Name Mapping repository.
  • You can run web tests in any WebDriver-compatible web browser, including those that are not supported by TestComplete directly, like Opera or Safari.
  • You can run web tests on non-Windows operating systems.
  • You do not need TestComplete (or TestExecute) installed in remote environments where your web tests will run.
  • You do not need to prepare web browsers in remote environments where your web tests will run.
  • You can get detailed test results.
Cons
  • You can only run web tests in a limited number of web browsers supported by TestComplete.
  • You can only run web tests on computers running under the Windows operating system.
  • You must have TestComplete (or TestExecute) on the computers where you run your web tests.
  • Web browsers in which you run your web tests must be prepared for testing in a special way.
Cons
  • Third-party controls are recognized as standard web elements.
  • Flash and Flex are not supported.

Default Web Testing

Cross-Platform Web Testing

Supported Browsers

Supported Web Technologies

CEF

AIR

Tasks Common for Web Testing

Additional Information

Related Topics of Interest

See Also

Applications Testing
Supported Development Tools

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