Applies to TestComplete 14.70, last modified on October 20, 2020

To simulate user actions over a web element in your tested web application or on a web page, your tests must locate the needed web element first. In cross-platform web tests, TestComplete locates web elements by using XPath expressions or CSS selectors.

Prerequisites

To create tests compatible with various browsers, operating systems and platforms, a new mode has been introduced in TestComplete. Enable this mode before you start creating your cross-platform tests:

Enabling cross-platform web tests in TestComplete

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To learn more, see Configuring TestComplete projects to locate web elements by their XPath expressions and CSS selectors.

Addressing Web Objects in Object Browser

You can explore the structure of your tested web page or web application and learn the tested objects' names while having the web page or application running in a web browser supported by TestComplete and on your local computer. To refer to an individual object in a tested web application, select the needed object in the Object Browser or by using the Object Spy. If your current TestComplete project is configured to locate web elements by using XPath expressions and CSS selectors, these tools will show how to get the selected object using the FindElement method. They will also show the list of available locators (search expressions) that can be used to get the element (if several expressions are available):

Addressing web objects by using FindElement method in Object Browser

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You can select the needed locator and then copy the code to the clipboard to insert it into your test.

If your tested web application generates the dynamic id attribute for web elements (for example, nav-123), you can configure TestComplete to detect and ignore such dynamic values and not to use them in the search expression in the Object Browser and Object Spy and during the test recording. To learn more, see Handle Dynamic Identifiers.

Note: You cannot access remote web browsers from the Object Browser or Object Spy.

Addressing Objects Using Name Mapping and Aliases

You may find the name that Object Browser or Object Spy generates for your tested web objects difficult to understand and not convenient to use in tests. To avoid possible issues, you can assign custom names to objects. This is called name mapping: TestComplete adds the object to the Name Mapping repository of your project, assigns a meaningful name to the object (you can change the name in any way you like) and search criteria that will be used to locate the object in the tested application. In this case, the search criteria will be a collection of locators: XPath expressions and CSS selectors. These are the same locators you can view in the Object Browser or Object Spy.

You use these custom names (aliases) to refer to objects in tests:

Getting web elements in keyword tests with Name Mapping

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For complete information on the name mapping concept, see Name Mapping.

Addressing Objects Without Name Mapping and Aliases

Your cross-platform web tests can interact with web elements that are not added to the Name Mapping repository. In this case, the test will refer to those objects by using a syntax that includes the FindElement method and one of the available locators.

In script tests

By default, in recorded tests that do not use Name Mapping, TestComplete uses the FindElement method and XPath expressions or CSS selectors to access individual objects in web applications under test. For example, the following script code shows how to get web elements by using their id and class name:

JavaScript, JScript

function Test()
{
  …
  var browser = Sys.Browser();
  var page = browser.Page("*services.smartbear.com/samples/TestComplete*/smartstore/");

  var textbox = page.FindElement("#instasearch");
  var searchbutton = page.FindElement(".instasearch-button");
  …
}

Python

def Test():
  …
  browser = Sys.Browser()
  page = browser.Page("*services.smartbear.com/samples/TestComplete*/smartstore/")

  textbox = page.FindElement("#instasearch")
  searchbutton = page.FindElement(".instasearch-button")
  …

VBScript

Sub Test()
  …
  Set browser = Sys.Browser()
  Set page = browser.Page("*services.smartbear.com/samples/TestComplete*/smartstore/")

  Set textbox = page.FindElement("#instasearch")
  Set searchbutton = page.FindElement(".instasearch-button")
  …
End Sub

DelphiScript

procedure Test();
var browser, page, textbox, searchbutton;
begin
  …
  browser := Sys.Browser();
  page := browser.Page('*services.smartbear.com/samples/TestComplete*/smartstore/');

  textbox := page.FindElement('#instasearch');
  searchbutton := page.FindElement('.instasearch-button');
  …
end;

C++Script, C#Script

function Test()
{
  …
  var browser = Sys["Browser"]();
  var page = browser["Page"]("*services.smartbear.com/samples/TestComplete*/smartstore/");

  var textbox = page["FindElement"]("#instasearch");
  var searchbutton = page["FindElement"](".instasearch-button");
  …
}

To pause the test execution until the needed web element is accessible, use the WaitElement method:

JavaScript, JScript

function Test()
{
  …
  var browser = Sys.Browser();
  var page = browser.Page("*services.smartbear.com/samples/TestComplete*/smartstore/");

  var textbox = page.WaitElement("#instasearch", 1000);
  var searchbutton = page.WaitElement(".instasearch-button", 3000);
  …
}

Python

def Test():
  …
  browser = Sys.Browser()
  page = browser.Page("*services.smartbear.com/samples/TestComplete*/smartstore/")

  textbox = page.WaitElement("#instasearch", 1000)
  searchbutton = page.WaitElement(".instasearch-button", 3000)
  …

VBScript

Sub Test()
  …
  Set browser = Sys.Browser()
  Set page = browser.Page("*services.smartbear.com/samples/TestComplete*/smartstore/")

  Set textbox = page.WaitElement("#instasearch", 1000)
  Set searchbutton = page.WaitElement(".instasearch-button", 3000)
  …
End Sub

DelphiScript

procedure Test();
var browser, page, textbox, searchbutton;
begin
  …
  browser := Sys.Browser();
  page := browser.Page('*services.smartbear.com/samples/TestComplete*/smartstore/');

  textbox := page.WaitElement('#instasearch', 1000);
  searchbutton := page.WaitElement('.instasearch-button', 3000);
  …
end;

C++Script, C#Script

function Test()
{
  …
  var browser = Sys["Browser"]();
  var page = browser["Page"]("*services.smartbear.com/samples/TestComplete*/smartstore/");

  var textbox = page["WaitElement"]("#instasearch", 1000);
  var searchbutton = page["WaitElement"](".instasearch-button", 3000);
  …
}
In keyword tests

To get the needed web elements in keyword tests, you can call the FindElement method (or the WaitElement method) of the tested web page or a web element by using the Call Object Method, Run Code Snippet, or Run Script Routine operations.

The image below shows a keyword test that gets tested objects by using the FindElement method:

Getting web elements in keyword tests

Click the image to enlarge it.

See Also

About Cross-Platform Web Tests

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