Working With Table View Controls - Basic Concepts

Applies to TestComplete 14.93, last modified on September 16, 2021

General Notes

TestComplete can recognize table view controls of the iOS Open Applications. It allows you to simulate actions on the table view using its methods and properties.

Specifics of Working With Table View Controls

The IOS TableView object layout is split into sections. Each section may contain any number of items, and each item may also include item details. The following image shows how these elements are placed:

TableView elements

The TableView object provides support for working with these elements.

The information below describes how to specify table view items in your tests:

Addressing Sections

The structure of the table view places items in sections. Each section may have its own title. To address the item from the section, use the wSection property of the TableView object. To address the section, use its name or index:

tableview.TouchItem("Section1", "Item1")    // Touch the item from section "Section1"

Addressing Items

Using Item Indexes and Names

It is possible to specify an item using section and item names or indexes. In most cases, you can use item and section names, in the following way:

tableview.TouchItem("Item1", "Section1")    // Touch an item

The sample script below simulates a touch on the "Name" item from the "Product Info" section of an application’s table view.

JavaScript, JScript

function Test()
{
  // Select the mobile device
  Mobile.SetCurrent("iPhone");
  // Obtain the TableView object
  var p = Mobile.Device().Process("SampleApp");
  var tableview = p.Window().TableView();

  // Touch the item
  tableview.TouchItem("Product Info", "Name");
}

Python

def Test():
  # Select the mobile device
  Mobile.SetCurrent("iPhone")
  # Obtain the TableView object 
  p = Mobile.Device().Process("SampleApp")
  tableview = p.Window().TableView()

  # Touch the item
  tableview.TouchItem("Product Info", "Name")

VBScript

Sub Test()
  Dim p, tableview
  ' Select the mobile device
  Mobile.SetCurrent("iPhone")
  ' Obtain the TableView object
  Set p = Mobile.Device.Process("SampleApp")
  Set tableview = p.Window().TableView()

  ' Touch the item
  Call tableview.TouchItem("Product Info", "Name")
End Sub

DelphiScript

procedure Test();
var
  p, tableview;
begin
  // Select the mobile device
  Mobile.SetCurrent('iPhone');
  // Obtain the TableView object
  p := Mobile.Device.Process('SampleApp');
  tableview := p.Window(0).TableView(0);

  // Touch the item
  tableview.TouchItem('Product Info', 'Name');
end;

C++Script, C#Script

function Test()
{
  // Select the mobile device
  Mobile["SetCurrent"]("iPhone");
  // Obtain the TableView object
  var p = Mobile["Device"]["Process"]("SampleApp");
  var tableview = p["Window"]()["TableView"]();

  // Touch the item
  tableview["TouchItem"]("Product Info", "Name");
}

If the table view does not display the text of items, you can find it using the properties of the iOS TableView object. Use the wItem property to obtain the name of an item.

If an item does not have a name, you can specify it using its index (in other words, the position). Indexes are zero-based: the first item of each section in the table view has index 0, the second - 1, and so on. The total number of items is specified by the wItemCount property. The last item will have index wItemCount - 1. To obtain the total number of items in the section, you can use the wItemCount property. In this case, the last item will have index wItemCount - 1. For instance, the example below simulates a touch on the first item and a long touch on the third item of the section:

JavaScript, JScript

function Test()
{
  // Select the mobile device
  Mobile.SetCurrent("iPhone");
  // Obtain the TableView object
  var p = Mobile.Device().Process("SampleApp");
  var tableview = p.Window().TableView();

  // Touch the item
  tableview.TouchItem("Section-1", 0);
  tableview.LongTouchItem("Section-1", 2);
}

Python

def Test():
  # Select the mobile device
  Mobile.SetCurrent("iPhone")
  # Obtain the TableView object 
  p = Mobile.Device().Process("SampleApp")
  tableview = p.Window().TableView()

  # Touch the item
  tableview.TouchItem("Section-1", 0)
  tableview.LongTouchItem("Section-1", 2)

VBScript

Sub Test()
  Dim p, tableview
  ' Select the mobile device
  Mobile.SetCurrent("iPhone")
  ' Obtain the TableView object
  Set p = Mobile.Device.Process("SampleApp")
  Set tableview = p.Window().TableView()

  ' Touch the item
  Call tableview.TouchItem("Section-1", 0)
  Call tableview.LongTouchItem("Section-1", 2)
End Sub

DelphiScript

procedure Test();
var
  p, tableview;
begin
  // Select the mobile device
  Mobile.SetCurrent('iPhone');
  // Obtain the TableView object
  p := Mobile.Device.Process('SampleApp');
  tableview := p.Window(0).TableView(0);

  // Touch the item
  tableview.TouchItem('Section-1', 0);
  tableview.LongTouchItem('Section-1', 2);
end;

C++Script, C#Script

function Test()
{
  // Select the mobile device
  Mobile["SetCurrent"]("iPhone");
  // Obtain the TableView object
  var p = Mobile["Device"]["Process"]("SampleApp");
  var tableview = p["Window"]()["TableView"]();

  // Touch the item
  tableview["TouchItem"]("Section-1", 0);
  tableview["LongTouchItem"]("Section-1", 2);
}

Checking if Item Is Selected

You can check if an item is selected by using the wItemSelected property. If the item is selected, this property returns true; otherwise - false. The following example checks whether the item is selected and posts the appropriate message to the test log:

JavaScript, JScript

function Test()
{
  // Select the mobile device
  Mobile.SetCurrent("iPhone");
  // Obtain the TableView object
  var p = Mobile.Device().Process("SampleApp");
  var tableview = p.Window().TableView();

  // Check if the item is selected
  if (tableview.wItemSelected(0, 1))
    Log.Message("The item is selected.")
  else
    Log.Message("The item is not selected.")
}

Python

def Test():
  # Select the mobile device
  Mobile.SetCurrent("iPhone")
  # Obtain the TableView object 
  p = Mobile.Device().Process("SampleApp")
  tableview = p.Window().TableView()

  # Check if the item is selected
  if tableview.wItemSelected[0, 1]:
    Log.Message("The item is selected.") 
  else:
    Log.Message("The item is not selected.")

VBScript

Sub Test()
  Dim p, tableview
  ' Select the mobile device
  Mobile.SetCurrent("iPhone")
  ' Obtain the TableView object
  Set p = Mobile.Device.Process("SampleApp")
  Set tableview = p.Window.TableView

  ' Check if the item is selected
  If tableview.wItemSelected(0, 1) Then
    Log.Message("The item is selected.")
  Else
    Log.Message("The item is not selected.")
  End If
End Sub

DelphiScript

procedure Test();
var
  p, tableview;
begin
  // Select the mobile device
  Mobile.SetCurrent('iPhone');
  // Obtain the TableView object
  p := Mobile.Device.Process('SampleApp');
  tableview := p.Window(0).TableView(0);

  // Check if the item is selected
  if tableview.wItemSelected(0, 1) then
    Log.Message('The item is selected.')
  else
    Log.Message('The item is not selected.')
end;

C++Script, C#Script

function Test()
{
  // Select the mobile device
  Mobile["SetCurrent"]("iPhone");
  // Obtain the TableView object
  var p = Mobile["Device"].Process("SampleApp");
  var tableview = p["Window"]()["TableView"]();
  
  tableview.TouchItem(0,1)

  // Check if the item is selected
  if (tableview["wItemSelected"](0, 1))
    Log["Message"]("The item is selected.")
  else
    Log["Message"]("The item is not selected.")
}

Using Case-Sensitive and Case-Insensitive Item Captions

Depending on the Use case-sensitive parameters project option, TestComplete treats titles as case-sensitive or case-insensitive. By default, this option is turned off so that you can specify the title in any case (all upper cases, all lower cases, mixed cases, and so on):

tableview.TouchItem("Item1", "SEction1")

tableview.TouchItem("ITEM1", "SECTION1")

tableview.TouchItem("item1", "section1")

tableview.TouchItem("ItEm1", "SeCtion1")

If Use case-sensitive parameters is checked, you can only specify titles using the correct case:

tableview.TouchItem("Item1", "Section1")  // Correct

tableview.TouchItem("item1", "section1")  // Incorrect!!!

Using Wildcards and Regular Expressions in Items Captions

If item titles change according to the current context, it may be useful to specify items only by constant parts of their names. To specify arbitrary parts in item names, TestComplete lets you use wildcard characters (* and ?) or regular expressions. The asterisk (*) corresponds to a string of any length (including an empty string), the question mark corresponds to any single character (including none). To specify more complicated parts of a caption, use regular expressions.

For example, the tested application’s table view contains the Undo item whose title depends on the undo buffer: if there is an action to undo, the item's title contains the Undo word and the action name (for example, Undo Typing or Undo Paste); if there are no actions to undo, the item's title is Can't Undo. In order to ensure stable recognition of the Undo menu item whatever name it has, you can replace the variable part of the name with the * wildcard:

tableview.TouchItem("*Undo*", 0)

In this example, we place the wildcard on both sides of the Undo word since it can either precede or follow other text.

See Also

Working With iOS Table View Controls
iOS TableView Support

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