Applies to TestExecute 14.10, last modified on May 13, 2019

Known Issues With Windows Updates

  • When TestExecute is running on a 32-bit Windows operating system, sometimes, the system can reboot unexpectedly. This issue is caused by a conflict between third-party licensing modules that TestExecute uses and specific Windows update libraries when TestExecute is trying to use certain system functions. Typically, this happens when an exception occurs in some application during the test run, or when TestExecute starts.

    Below is a list of problematic Windows updates. They all apply to 32-bit versions of Windows. If you need to run your tests on these versions, we would recommend uninstalling these updates.

    Windows 10 x86          

    KB4088776

    Windows 8.1 x86

    KB4088876

    KB4088879

  • The following Windows updates cause a performance slowdown of TestExecute and its subsystems. We recommend uninstalling them before you run your tests:

    Windows 10 x64          

    KB4058702

    KB4088776

    Windows 10 x86

    KB4088776

    Windows 8.1 x64

    KB4056895

     

    Windows 8.1 x86

    KB4088876

    KB4088879

Specifics of Testing on Windows 10

  • The Superfetch service sometimes preloads Windows Store (Modern UI) applications to memory and keeps them in a suspended state. When TestExecute checks on these applications (for example, when updating the object tree), they are started and get focused, which may interrupt your test run.

    To prevent this, disable the Superfetch service in the Control Panel on your computer (to get to the Control Panel’s Services window faster, type services.msc in the command line).

    An alternative workaround is to disable the Enable support for testing Windows Store applications option in TestExecute. You can find it in the Tools > Options > Engines > General Options dialog. The option is visible if you run TestExecute on Windows 8 or Windows 10. You can enable this option only when you need to test Windows Store applications and disable it when you need to test any other applications on Windows 10.

  • To test Windows Store applications, TestExecute must be installed in a subfolder of the <Program Files> folder (<Program Files (x86)> on the 64-bit edition of Windows). The easiest way to do this is to install TestExecute into the default installation folder.

  • You cannot use the MSAA engine to test Flash and Flex applications running in Microsoft Edge or in Internet Explorer 11.

  • If you want to work with TestExecute via COM, your applications must have enhanced privileges. For more information on that, see Configuring Manifests on Windows 8 and Windows 10.

Specifics of Testing on Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012

  • To test Windows Store applications, TestExecute must be installed in a subfolder of the <Program Files> folder (<Program Files (x86)> on the 64-bit edition of Windows). The easiest way to do this is to install TestExecute into the default installation folder.

  • You cannot use the MSAA engine to test Flash and Flex applications running in Internet Explorer 11.

  • If you want to work with TestExecute via COM, your applications must have enhanced privileges. For more information on that, see Configuring Manifests on Windows 8 and Windows 10.

Windows Server 2008 Requirement

If you use Windows Server 2008 R2, then you must install the WoW64 component of this operating system. This component is required by the TestExecute engine. The Server Core installation option for Windows Server 2008 R2 does not install WoW64 by default, so you should install it yourself.

See Also

Working With TestExecute Under Limited User Accounts
TestExecute and Windows Firewall

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